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JTG6
Level 1: Cadet

NBN

Answered
Hi all, I've had NBN for about a year now. Early on it was great but now constantly in backup mode.
I've done all the tests, was sent a new Modem, more tests by remote technicians who can see my dropouts. Still no answer.
Could my external/central splitter be the cause? Who removes them if that's the case?
At my wits end now 😵
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Level 24: Supreme Being
Level 24: Supreme Being
Accepted Solution

Re: NBN

If it was the central external splitter it would have caused problems when you were first connected to the NBN so it would not be the single cause but it could contribute to the fault. The central splitter adds extra load to your line which will reduce the signal level and also because it no longer has a phone connected to it there is a impedance mismatch so removing it might fix the problem.

 

Only qualified ACMA licensed cabler can remove the splitter. See link below.

https://www.acma.gov.au/Industry/Telco/Infrastructure/Cabling-rules/customer-cabling-rules-and-requi....

 

The problem is more likely to be a lose connection either in the internal house wiring, in the street cabling or Node.

 

Has a NBN technician come out to check your line?

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5 REPLIES 5
Level 24: Supreme Being
Level 24: Supreme Being
Accepted Solution

Re: NBN

If it was the central external splitter it would have caused problems when you were first connected to the NBN so it would not be the single cause but it could contribute to the fault. The central splitter adds extra load to your line which will reduce the signal level and also because it no longer has a phone connected to it there is a impedance mismatch so removing it might fix the problem.

 

Only qualified ACMA licensed cabler can remove the splitter. See link below.

https://www.acma.gov.au/Industry/Telco/Infrastructure/Cabling-rules/customer-cabling-rules-and-requi....

 

The problem is more likely to be a lose connection either in the internal house wiring, in the street cabling or Node.

 

Has a NBN technician come out to check your line?

JTG6
Level 1: Cadet

NBN

Hi, superb response, thankyou.
No the Telstra helpdesk have only done tests offshore.
I'll ring and have a technician sent out.
fredvau
Level 1: Cadet

Re: NBN

I had NBN FTTC installed recently. My house originally had a 4 wire cable but only the white/blue wires were used. Some years ago I had a Telstra splitter installed and the technician explained that my wall sockets were daisy chained with white/blue and he wired my modem with the black/red which gave me a dedicated ADSL line and the phones no longer needed individual filters. When the self install kit arrived, the Internet via the modem worked fine but no phone. Nobody at Telstra was able to help as to which cable to plug into the modem, i.e, white/blue or red/black. As the Internet was working a check at that socket revealed the red/black cable, which comes via the splitter. I had no phone for a few days as the blue light for phone connection kept on flashing and in desperation I simply cut the white/blue in the Telstra splitter leaving the red/black in tact. Next I noticed that the phone light at the Frontier modem now changed to solid blue (it flashed continuously before), plugged in a Telstra compatible phone and Presto, phone worked. Purchased a Telstra DECT phone with 3 handsets plus a Telstra wireless phone extender and everything works. I then checked other existing daisy chained sockets with the Telstra original phone and each existing socket works. Prior to NBN I had 4 working sockets plus ADSL line and now I have actually 3 handsets with the DECT phone plus 3 of the original pre NBN Telstra phones, all working fine.
Bottom line is my question, was the above described method the correct way? Everything works, no technician required to amend any wiring and all I did was to cut the phone blue/white wires in that Telstra splitter with the phones now being powered via one of the two green phone sockets at the back of the modem by inserting a phone cable into a green port and the other end into the adjoining socket which I knew had white/blue wires and is daisy chained to other sockets. The DECT phone base unit uses the other green socket.
fredv
Level 24: Supreme Being
Level 24: Supreme Being

Re: NBN

What you did is technically illegal as only a technician with a cabler's license can  work telecommunications cabling. It like replacing a electrical socket or switch. There are plenty of people capable of doing the job but by law only a qualified electrician can do the work.

fredvau
Level 1: Cadet

Re: NBN

OOps!!. In any case I do not need those sockets anymore as the 3-handset DECT phone plus a rarely used mobile is all I need - lounge, kitchen and bedroom. Will leave the sockets unused rather then have them and cabling removed which would come at some expense. Btw, I do have a good knowledge of electronics and some years ago successfully obtained an Australian patent for an electronic device I invented but all that is now historical. Currently enjoying a retired life.
fredv

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