Level 1: Cadet

Speed bundles

Answered

My connection is (1) optic fibre to a nearby box (this is the 'node'), and (2) copper wire from the node to the premises. Telstra has advised that I cannot get the speed I have contracted ( 50 mpbs )for and offered a switch to the std plan which is 25mpbs. My question is how is the lower speed monitored, will I get what the line is now delivering ( about 40mpbs ) or will I get 25Mpbs or less?

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Level 21: Augmented
Accepted Solution

Re: Speed bundles

If Telstra have sold you a plan that can't be delivered (i.e. the 50 Mbps), you have the option to:

(i) stay with that plan but accept what can actually be delivered (40 Mbps) or;

(ii) go with a lower plan (25 Mbps) which will only give you 25 Mbps.

 

The ability to deliver any particular speed ties lies  with NBN really.

 

If you take option (i),  you could try negotiation with Telstra to compensate you with a monthly credit for the lower actual speed. If upgrades are applied to the NBN network later, you might get that full 50 Mbps eventually. Your focus in negotiating the credit would be on Telstra actually selling you something that they can't deliver for whatever reason.

 

If you go with option (ii) you will only ever get 25 Mbps and will have to watch the capabilities for services in your location to see if the speed tiers improve, then try the upgrade path (Telstra plans are month to month and you can change plan once per billing cycle).

 

The choice is yours, but be aware that base NBN network services are upgraded quite often, usually without any notice to existing customers.

Stevo 52
Too many devices, probably an addict :-) also a tinkerer and developer of stuff..
Not with Telstra, just another customer like you!

View solution in original post

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1 REPLY 1
Level 21: Augmented
Accepted Solution

Re: Speed bundles

If Telstra have sold you a plan that can't be delivered (i.e. the 50 Mbps), you have the option to:

(i) stay with that plan but accept what can actually be delivered (40 Mbps) or;

(ii) go with a lower plan (25 Mbps) which will only give you 25 Mbps.

 

The ability to deliver any particular speed ties lies  with NBN really.

 

If you take option (i),  you could try negotiation with Telstra to compensate you with a monthly credit for the lower actual speed. If upgrades are applied to the NBN network later, you might get that full 50 Mbps eventually. Your focus in negotiating the credit would be on Telstra actually selling you something that they can't deliver for whatever reason.

 

If you go with option (ii) you will only ever get 25 Mbps and will have to watch the capabilities for services in your location to see if the speed tiers improve, then try the upgrade path (Telstra plans are month to month and you can change plan once per billing cycle).

 

The choice is yours, but be aware that base NBN network services are upgraded quite often, usually without any notice to existing customers.

Stevo 52
Too many devices, probably an addict :-) also a tinkerer and developer of stuff..
Not with Telstra, just another customer like you!

View solution in original post

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