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Level 1: Cadet

Ultimate Cable doesn't feel that Ultimate

There is nothing technically wrong with my Ultimate Cable connection as it performs within specification.

 

It doesn't feel like an Ultimate service when a $27 web camera can't work properly in Skype because of the limits of Ultimate Cable. Skype HD (720p mode) needs around 5Mbps to provide a quality HD stream, which is fine on the download side, but completely lacking on the up stream side. Now a $27 Logitech web camera isn't exactly cutting edge technology here and it is something many home users would want to use, but they can't.

 

Now Skype supports 1080p HD and the new Logitech C920 camera to suit is only $130. You don't even need a particularly fast computer because the camera does the H264 encoding. To support this you need around 8Mbps up and down bandwidth. Again, this is nothing very advanced and very much within the range of what the average home user would expect to be able to use on their Ultimate Cable servce, but of course they can't, because the lowly 2.4Mbps up stream just isn't enough.

 

Of course I am referring here to just one user and the vast majority of Ultimate Cable customers will be in house of 3 or more persons.This makes the whole experience even more disappointing as one person making a Skype video call is already consuming the whole of the available up stream bandwidth, so many tasks carried out by anyone else using the connection will be a poor compromise for both users.

 

Ultimate Cable doesn't feel like the Ultimate service when there are wireless services like Telstra 4G LTE which are providing five times the up stream bandwidth of Ultimate Cable.

 

In an age when internet has become far more interactive with people sharing photos on Facebook and videos on Youtube, not to mention all the other cloud services, up stream bandwidth has become so important. The DOCSIS 3.0 standard used by Telstra on its Ultimate Cable service has the capability to provide much more up stream bandwidth to meet these needs, so why won't Telstra offer it?

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2 REPLIES 2
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Level 21: Augmented

Re: Ultimate Cable doesn't feel that Ultimate

most of the technologies available in our market are capable of much faster speeds for upload, you're not the only one suffering this problem unfortunately
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Statistically, three out of five people are not the other two
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Level 22: Superhuman

Re: Ultimate Cable doesn't feel that Ultimate

In an age when internet has become far more interactive with people sharing photos on Facebook and videos on Youtube, not to mention all the other cloud services, up stream bandwidth has become so important. The DOCSIS 3.0 standard used by Telstra on its Ultimate Cable service has the capability to provide much more up stream bandwidth to meet these needs, so why won't Telstra offer it?


I can only speculate here. Thankfully the corporate world has taught me to think beyond individual wants and expanded my intellectual horizons, and so now a couple of reasons come to mind when I ponder the question:

 

Such applications as HD video streaming uplink are not commonly required in the consumer / residential broadband market, even though some users may desire them for entertainment value or a sort of ‘just because I can’ vanity. On the other hand, commercial organisations may find those applications to be of business value. Even today, some businesses (not limited to SOHO set-ups) have elected to use BigPond Cable – which is marketed as a residential grade broadband service only – for business purposes/applications, even though business grade alternatives are available, in the name of cost control. Closing the gap (functionally and non-functionally) between BigPond Cable and what Telstra Business offers the market would therefore be apt to erode revenue, and should be avoided.

 

Even if that wasn't an issue, and the vast majority of SOHO and small-to-medium enterprises are too prudent to rely on a cheap residential grade broadband option, at this point there isn't sufficient demand in the consumer market for the uplink bandwidth-hungry applications, such that suitable broadband service offerings can command the sort of premium one would reasonably expect early adopters of technology to ante up. I'm not denying the interest in those applications is out there, but the interest needs to be convertible into profit, in order for it to be commercially sound to offer the less-asymmetric broadband service. Putting it on the market too early, and then have to drop the price when it's not supported by sufficient demand, would squander the opportunity for profit maximisation.

 

For now, I'm not convinced that those residential users who desire a broadband service that ‘feels Ultimate’ to them are willing and prepared to pay a price premium that ‘feels Ultimate’ against their hip pockets, so I guess we'll just settle for run-of-the-mill Ultimate service at run-of-the-mill Ultimate prices.

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Departed from CrowdSupport as of 12 June 2013, when the fun factor for me had finally completely evaporated with all the recent site layout and functionality changes, and the apparent efforts to turn a community goodwill-powered vehicle into something closer to a customer service channel.

The opinions and sentiments expressed above are mine only, and do not necessarily reflect Telstra's views or position. I work at Telstra, but my participation here is strictly in a personal capacity as a fellow Australian telecommunications services consumer, and you can safely assume you are not my customer, client, patron, benefactor or friend when I post in this forum.

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