jdwango
Level 2: Rookie

Privacy Manager?

Hi,

   In America, we had a service called "Privacy Manager" that we could pay for. When a caller called in with no caller ID or a blocked CLIP, It would tell them that the person they are calling does not accept unidentified calls, and ask them to enter their phone number or record their name. It then called my phone, and played the recoreded name or number. Does telstra have a similar product? --JM

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10 REPLIES 10
jokiin
Level 21: Augmented

Re: Privacy Manager?

don't think any telco here has that, good feature too
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Statistically, three out of five people are not the other two
Ben_F
Community Alumni (Retired)

Re: Privacy Manager?


@jokiin wrote:
don't think any telco here has that, good feature too

+1 - I would pay a premium for something like that!!

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Parash
Level 8: Inspector

Re: Privacy Manager?

Great idea.
-- Parash
Opinions expressed are mine alone.
jokiin
Level 21: Augmented

Re: Privacy Manager?

the other feature I'd like to see (while we're dreaming) that other carriers have is SMS forwarding
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Statistically, three out of five people are not the other two
KrayzeeKev
Level 17: Bureau Chief

Re: Privacy Manager?


@jokiin wrote:
the other feature I'd like to see (while we're dreaming) that other carriers have is SMS forwarding

There are significant technical hurdles in the way of that. Actually, they're mostly financial, the technical solutions already exist to solve other problems. Within a single telco, it's easy. You tell your central message routing system to redirect. You have to do loop detection in some way as well which complicates it since you lose the interim addresses. You might be able to find a spot to record hop-count which can be used to shortcut loops.

 

BUT the problem is inter-carrier SMS. The way SMS is delivered in GSM is (exactly the same way calls are routed) that the sending network queries the HLR of the receiving network, asking which MSC is handling that phone. The HLR sends back the address of the MSC and then the "Mobile Terminating" SMSC (the one doing the final delivery - AFTER the network routing would have taken place) in the sending network talks to the MSC in the receiving network and asks it to deliver. That MSC then talks to base station controllers, to find the phone and deliver it.

 

So how do you do forwarding? The MSC is only responsible for dealing with phones, it's not into forwarding. And the entire central routing core of the SMS network has been bypassed. 

 

The answer is what is called "Home Network Routing" which gets that HLR to "lie" to the sending network, giving it the address of a box that looks like an MSC to the sending network and behaves like one for that interaction. But, instead of going and finding the phone and delivering the message, this thing just sends it into the SMS core just as if it came from a phone in the local network.

 

This kind technology was used for CDMA SMS. Since CDMA networks don't have SMSCs or MSCs, there wasn't a machine for the HLR to point to. So a telco could build/deploy one of those "fake MSCs" to capture the message and then send it to the CDMA SMS box which the GSM network didn't even know could exist. A similar technique is used for SMSes that go to computer programs instead of people - all those 042 voting lines (see - they share the same number prefix as the old CDMA numbers - no coincidence). Same thing happens. HLR points the messages inwards.

 

So, the solution exists. BUT you have to increase the number and capacity of those fake MSCs so they can handle ALL messages coming from external carriers. That's a large investment and a big change in the pattern of traffic through all those core components. Not something you do overnight. And there has to be a monetary reward from doing so. It was designed that way to begin with because it's efficient. 

 

And then you have to build the product/service constructs, billing, etc - all the invisible and expensive stuff telcos deal with.

 

It'll come, I believe. In time. But it needs to pay for itself. That's the big issue.

--
Kevin
[ I am a Telstra Employee however my posts here are done in a personal capacity.]
jokiin
Level 21: Augmented

Re: Privacy Manager?

yeah not like it's impossible, 3HK offer SMS forwarding as a paid service
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Statistically, three out of five people are not the other two
Drat
Level 22: Superhuman

Re: Privacy Manager?

Firstly, I personally find it refreshing to see someone requesting new services and/or functionality with a view to paying for it, as opposed to just demanding an ‘answer’ from companies to a ‘question’ along the lines of, “Why oh why won't you provide ‹blah› to me (without wanting to charge me more money), when I have seen examples of it elsewhere in the world?” For that, jdwango, I sincerely thank you for your post.


When a caller called in with no caller ID or a blocked CLIP, It would tell them that the person they are calling does not accept unidentified calls, and ask them to enter their phone number or record their name. It then called my phone, and played the recoreded name or number.

I'm curious as to how well received it is – from the perspective of the unidentified callers – as evidenced by the percentage of time they consequently supply their contact details, with a view to implicitly request a return call.

 

The alternative available right now is plain old voicemail, in which the recorded voice prompt typically asks the caller to leave their name and number. Whether the unidentified call is diverted to voicemail because the party receiving the call actively rejects it by a press of a button, or a smartphone app does it on behalf of the handset user, the outcome would be more or less the same, even though the ‘response time’ and level of user convenience varies.

 

I think the real difference between making do with what's there (ie. the alternative solution above), and using something like Privacy Manager as a service provided by the carrier network, is I suppose the response to the unidentified caller is more explicit and pointed, being effectively: “This caller does not accept unidentified calls. If you want to talk to him/her, you need to do so on his/her terms, which starts with supplying your contact details, and he/she will call you back when it is convenient to him/her,” and yet it may seem less confrontational to have an automaton deliver the response on behalf of the service subscriber. (It's slightly passive aggressive, in my opinion, to set up that kind of communication barrier, specifically in the “computer says no” aspect.)

 

How many subscribers are prepared to pay a price for the convenience and, more importantly, the tone of the response would be interesting data. Does the Privacy Manager product also allow for a user-programmable schedule for switching itself on and off, and for not calling through to the subscriber's phone (with the caller's contact details) if it's in the middle of the night upon receiving an unidentified call, etc.?

——
Departed from CrowdSupport as of 12 June 2013, when the fun factor for me had finally completely evaporated with all the recent site layout and functionality changes, and the apparent efforts to turn a community goodwill-powered vehicle into something closer to a customer service channel.

The opinions and sentiments expressed above are mine only, and do not necessarily reflect Telstra's views or position. I work at Telstra, but my participation here is strictly in a personal capacity as a fellow Australian telecommunications services consumer, and you can safely assume you are not my customer, client, patron, benefactor or friend when I post in this forum.
Ben_F
Community Alumni (Retired)

Re: Privacy Manager?

Just for the Record, I'm happy to be a test case for a system like that if Telstra wanted to beta test it. I would probably purchase it as an addon service (simply to stop the late night calls from unknown numbers).

 

B.

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funkebeatz
Level 1: Cadet

Re: Privacy Manager?

r u online
???
DEANJA
Level 23: Superhero

Re: Privacy Manager?

We might need a little more information funkebeatz if you have a question.

If I have provided an answer, or posed a question that helps or interests you, your KUDOS vote would be appreciated Image and video hosting by TinyPic
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NB: I am NOT a Telstra employee, just another customer like you.

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