Applez1
Level 1: Cadet

Upgrade router on fttc 50/20

Hello Legends, I need some advice in regards to upgrading from the Telstra Smart gen2 modem. I have fibre to the kerb and a lot of smart devices in my home. About 80ish, plus lots of cameras etc. The telstra modem is not cutting the mustard. I'm running CAT 6 cable to all the 5 gigahertz devices and will be installing a patch panel and switch in the near future. Looking for a router that has good WiFi technology and plenty of balls. Have voip and also would like to keep 4g back up but that's at the bottom of the list. Hit me with your knowledge

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4 REPLIES 4
SteveW_52
Level 22: Superhuman
Level 22: Superhuman

Re: Upgrade router on fttc 50/20

Where is the Telstra modem failing?

 

You say you are connecting CAT 6 cable to all the 5GHz Wi-Fi devices, can you explain that please?

 

Do a lot of those devices you have communicate with the outside world and not just in your network?

 

You can keep the Telstra modem/4G and landline and still set up an additional router/network if that is what you need, but I am curious as to where the problems are arising? If it is Wi-Fi, you could look at the Telstra Wi-Fi Booster guarantee offering to get up to three free boosters (AP's really) running off the Telstra modem to give better coverage..  but you will still be limited by your internet service?

Stevo 52
Too many devices, probably an addict :-) also a tinkerer and developer of stuff..
Not with Telstra, just another customer like you!
Mkrtich
Level 21: Augmented
Level 21: Augmented

Re: Upgrade router on fttc 50/20

Hi - with so many 2.4Ghz Smart Home and IoT devices in home, if your current system is not handling the traffic load,  you are WiFi 6 vendors' dream come true and targeted user. Whilst this technology is heavily marketed for it increased speed potential which maybe marginal for general users, its real benefit is the ability handle the WiFi space more efficiently, particularly in applications that have a high concentration of IoT devices. WiFi 6 is known as IEEE 802.11ax and will operate in both 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz bands and uses a different coding scheme to allow a significant increased number of devices to operate concurrently whilst supporting previous 802.11n (2.4Ghz) and 802.11ac(5Ghz) coding schemes which means all your existing devices should continue as is without congestion. Most newly released smart phones also support WiFi 6 now. 

 

This year will see all major vendors focusing their marketing towards to WiFi 6 modems with most leading brands enabling either the open WiFi EasyMesh standard or proprietary Mesh systems into their Boosters and WPA3 Security. The next stage of enhancement to WiFi 6, is the release of WiFi 6E which introduces a new 6Ghz frequency band for added throughput capacity - this will require Government approval of the band, so not sure when it will occur in Australia. 

 

Suggest you view YouTube clips on the WiFi 6 technology and then see reviews of vendors offerings - it not a cheap investment with Boosters included - under $1,000. Leading vendors have budget entry, mid and higher cost models to cater for different customer requirements. 

cf4
Level 25: The Singularity
Level 25: The Singularity

Re: Upgrade router on fttc 50/20

Suggest you get a WiFi 6 router and connect directly to NBN NTD. Connect the Telstra modem's WAN port to a LAN port of the new router and turn WiFi off on Telstra modem. This will give you a phone service. For phone to work you might have to change SIP ALG settings in the new router. You will also need to change the LAN IP address on either the new router or the Telstra modem if they both use the same subset (!92.168.0.xx).

 

You want have automatic 4G fallover but if there is an outage disconnect Telstra modem's WAN port from LAN port of  new router, disconnect  WAN port from of new router from NTD and connect to LAN port of Telstra modem. The Telstra modem will switch to 4G backup and supply internet to new router.

Mkrtich
Level 21: Augmented
Level 21: Augmented

Re: Upgrade router on fttc 50/20

I would like to correct a statement I made in the first paragraph - "which means all your existing devices should continue as is without congestion" - got carried away with marketing hype.

 

I should have mentioned an important caveat in relation to WiFi 6 deployment which is generally overlooked in vendor marketing information or is hidden in the fine print and that is, in order to achieve the full functionality and benefits of the promised Wireless Nirvana world , the devices need to support WiFi 6. Whilst this is possible today with certain Macs, Windows PCs, PCI Adapters, USB Adapters and some WiFi Boosters, due to their low design costs and quantities in home, the existing IoT/Smart Home devices which are generally 2.4Ghz based and may or may not be connected to Smart Home Hubs, could for many people remain as is for a long time due to replacement costs when they become available in 802.11ax versions. They will still operate under a WiFi 6 environment due to its mandated backward compatibility but they can't use WiFi 6 OFDMA signalling schemes which deliver the full benefits of WiFi 6, so it is not proper to say "without congestion".

 

You may see some improvements in speeds and traffic capacity handling, particularly from high end 802.11ax modems that have more modern multi Core CPU engines and accompanying WiFi 6 radios which use 8x8:8 Stream configurations vs entry level WiFi 6 2x2:2 stream versions, however the device governs it connectivity speed and signaling capabilities. Migrating as many devices in home from wireless to wired connections using PoE Managed LAN switches with VLAN functionality is a good strategy for Security and Smart Home devices.

 

Retaining your Telstra Gen 2 modem for telephone line and physical separation for certain devices also comes handy and makes sense; it's a high end 802.11ac Wave 2 modem with strong WiFi credentials. Security organisations and the FBI recommend that cloud based IoT/Smart Home devices to be separated from the main LAN in order to prevent them being used for unauthorised access to your main LAN by either placing them into your existing modem's Guest WiFi Networks or physically separated networks in another router or security gateway.

 

Given your situation doesn't lend itself to a typical off-the-shelf residential solution, you may find products that fall into a semi-professional category of interest. I would suggest you do plenty of research on technology and vendor options first so that you match what you need for your requirements. Given the pace of change, Technologies may need to be refreshed every five years.

 

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